Important Announcement: SongWritingFever.com will be shutting down all user-interactive pages effective as of Saturday 13 September 2014. We are very sorry about this. We will be working very hard to bring it back as soon as we can in a much better shape than it is now. What this means is that you will not be able to submit or view lyrics, upload or download songs, view other members profiles, sign up or sign in, or post to the forum. Again, we are terribly sorry about this and we hope that we can bring all those functions and more back soon.

So You Wrote Some Lyrics... - P4



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Choosing A Collaborator

So now that you know where and how to publish your lyrics so that you are able to attract songwriters and musicians towards collaborating with you, you should also know how to screen the collaboration offers that will, hopefully:), come pouring down on you.

How to choose the right collaborator?! In my opinion, there are some qualities that a musician should have if you are going to surrender your song to him/her...

A musician should know his/her stuff. You don't want to work with a musician who doesn't know the first thing about music. Trust me on that one, some people think they can compose music while, in fact, all they can do is come up with nice melody for the lyrics. They might not even be able to write it down in music notation or know what scale it's in...etc.

Good musicians are those who know their way around music theory, chord progressions and scales. These people, and only these, are going to be able to handle writing music for your lyrics from A to Z until it's finally shaped into a complete song. Also, a musician who understands music theory can communicate with you better in the sense that he/she can take your suggestions -being as unprofessional or un-musical as they are- and turn them into real music ideas that can be incorporated successfully into your song.

Do you want to have your song recorded soon? If you really want to have a song out of your lyrics, you have to get it recorded. Now recording a song is not the unreachable difficult task you might think it is. To record a song, you just have to have a computer and some "musically-correct" voice (and ears) at the least.

Make sure the songwriter you choose to collaborate with is able to record a song. Great quality and professional sound are not necessary at all; at this point your not going for the Rock'n'Roll Hall of Fame ;)...You are just trying to make a demo out of your lyrics, so you can later sell yourself as a lyricist using that demo. Ask before you begin collaboration if your future collaborator can record songs or not.

Ask to listen to some previous work. You have to like the music this collaborator writes. Before working with someone, you have to make sure you love their previous work. Listening to your future partner's previous work will also give you an idea of their style and genres they like to write in. Make sure that you both like the same genres of music.

Make sure there is a real person out there. If you are collaborating over the Internet and you never met your collaborator, make sure you have complete contact information and full name...Never collaborate with an email and some picture! This is very important for legal purposes later, besides you have to be sure they are not going to vanish in thin air all of a sudden.

When you check for all these qualities and finally choose a collaborator, get to work with enthusiasm and never be afraid to share your ideas or object if there's something you don't like...

Enjoy writing your song and enjoy listening to it when it's done :)


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